News, views & analysis blogs by: Samuel Kiefer





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Samuel Kiefer :
THREE AT A TIME



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Samuel Kiefer :
The new manufacturing method bonds an injection moulded part with a blow moulded while the moulding of both is still in progress. Up to now blow moulded and injection moulded elements were formed in separate process steps each and later on bonded by welding in a third step. Those three production steps are now integrated into one single production phase.
Either the injection moulding and bonding takes place at about the same time as the blow moulding within the same tool or after the blowing in a second one. Yet both options have synchronous injection moulding and bonding in common. This is the unique selling proposition of both. Röchling Automotive branded the term JectBonding™ for this approach.

In comparison with the multi step process the main advantages are simplifying, cutting the corner and avoiding defects: Welding as a bonding method produces always defects. Jectbonding minimizes this scrap. Depending on parts geometry and material the much more robust process allows for a much more reliable cost fundamentals. The combining of process steps creates even further cost cutting potentials. Thus, there is a win-win situation for OEM and supplier as well.
With a growing order book Röchling Automotive feels entitled to say, that there must be a competitive advantage over quotes based on welding.
Jectbonding in a separate tool is already applied at charge air tubes of the Opel Corsa and Vectra for several engines. Additionally the process will be applied at the future Vectra. "The method is already series proven and will therefore be used for further parts,“ explains Gernot Henß of the Opel thermal-development.
Jectbonding within the blow mould debuts globally with the charge air tubes for the new VW common rail engines. „Further projects will follow,“ according to a statement of the Volkswagen development department.






Saleem
This is a great post I have made curtains for my lvinig room (no sew just used the hem tape), but haven´t hemmed them yet because I wasn´t sure which look I liked best. I think we´ll have to do Option #1 because they´re not just decorative and my son likes to play by the window so I´d be afraid of him trampling them.A thing I have found is the IKEA has great long-length curtains. We bought some cheapo white ones for my girls´ room and I think they were 118" plus they come with the hemming tape for about $15. I think all (or most?) of their curtains are DIY-hem, so they have long lengths.




















































































































































































































































































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